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Key considerations for your next project

CHOOSING THE RIGHT DEEP DRAW SUPPLIER

Choosing the Right Deep Draw Supplier

Key considerations for your next project

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Deep draw - the process of transforming blank sheets of metal into a variety of parts – is one of the most popular metal forming methods available to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). With so many possibilities, choosing the right supplier for your project is key.

Deep draw 

Deep draw specifically refers to shaping an object whose depth is equal to or greater than its radius. Because deep draw can shape an object while retaining the properties of the metal used, it’s a go-to method for making things like auto parts, sinks, cans, and metal pieces of all shapes and sizes. With so many possibilities, choosing the right supplier for your project is key. Here are a few things to consider when vetting manufacturers.

Production capabilities and capacity

First things first: confirm the supplier has a variety of capabilities – the more offered in-house the better, particularly if those services include tooling and annealing. Benefits to working with a supplier like this include:

COST SAVINGSEFFICIENCYQUALITY
Your project won’t need to be outsourced for tooling, prototyping, or at other phases in the production processKeeping your project in-house can eliminate lengthy lead-times.Annealing is key to successfully shaping wider or deeper parts which may need multiple draws. Not every manufacturer can offer this important service.

Capacity is also a critical piece of the process. Manufacturers with access to multiple facilities are more likely to be able to accommodate your production schedule. What’s more, these suppliers are better able to scale their process to fit your needs, whether you need a few hundred custom pieces or a few hundred-thousand.

Experienced experts make a difference 

A quick internet search will return dozens of potential suppliers for your project. This is where looking into a company’s history can pay off. Suppliers with a long history of providing deep draw services are also more likely to have created a part similar to your part before – meaning they aren’t reinventing the wheel (or cylinder) with every project that comes through their doors. 

With experience comes expertise. When a supplier has “seen it all,” they can provide valuable feedback on your deep draw product design before it goes to production, and offer suggestions to ensure a successful production. Ask if the supplier can create prototypes or even a simulation of the proposed deep draw process for your approval. That will save both parties time and budget in the long-run. 

When considering a deep draw supplier, don’t overlook other capabilities such as annealing and reverse-draw capabilities. Annealing is a process using very high heat which makes metal more ductile and easier to shape. Reverse-draw creates a piece with a greater height than diameter - perfect for smaller pieces such as beverage cans. Like tooling, most manufacturers don’t offer these important services in-house. Finding one that does can save you time and budget.

Long-term trust

The best option for your deep draw project ultimately comes down to a manufacturer’s experts and equipment. When a supplier has the right experience combined with a robust set of capabilities, OEMs rely on them again and again to create the pieces they need to bring products to market. 

Ask any potential suppliers about long-term relationships or whether they’ve provided services to an OEM for multiple product generations. While it may not be the most important factor in your decision-making process, knowing the supplier you are considering is trusted by organizations you respect can add a little extra peace-of-mind.

5 QUESTIONS TO ASK DEEP DRAW SUPPLIERS

Question 1
Question 2Question 3
Question 4
Question 5
What industries do you serve and what types of products do you work with?
How much experience do you have with deep draw?
What are your redundancy or risk plans?
What in-house capabilities do you offer that complement your deep draw services?

Do you have in-house design support?

Download White Paper

Deep Draw
Deep draw specifically refers to shaping an object whose depth is equal to or greater than its radius. Because deep draw can shape an object while retaining the properties of the metal used, it’s a go-to method for making things like auto parts, sinks, cans, and metal pieces of all shapes and sizes. With so many possibilities, choosing the right supplier for your project is key. Here are a few things to consider when vetting manufacturers.

Production capabilities and capacity
First things first: confirm the supplier has a variety of capabilities – the more offered in-house the better, particularly if those services include tooling and annealing. Benefits to working with a supplier like this include:

Cost Savings Efficiency Quality
Your project won’t need to be outsourced for tooling, prototyping, or at other phases in the production process.Keeping your project in-house can eliminate lengthy lead-times.Annealing is key to successfully shaping wider or deeper parts which may need multiple draws. Not every manufacturer can offer this important service.

Capacity is also a critical piece of the process. Manufacturers with access to multiple facilities are more likely to be able to accommodate your production schedule. What’s more, these suppliers are better able to scale their process to fit your needs, whether you need a few hundred custom pieces or a few hundred-thousand.

Experienced experts make a difference
A quick internet search will return dozens of potential suppliers for your project. This is where looking into a company’s history can pay off. Suppliers with a long history of providing deep draw services are also more likely to have created a part similar to your part before – meaning they aren’t reinventing the wheel (or cylinder) with every project that comes through their doors. With experience comes expertise. When a supplier has “seen it all,” they can provide valuable feedback on your deep draw product design before it goes to production, and offer suggestions to ensure a successful production. Ask if the supplier can create prototypes or even a simulation of the proposed deep draw process for your approval. That will save both parties time and budget in the long-run. When considering a deep draw supplier, don’t overlook other capabilities such as annealing and reverse-draw capabilities. Annealing is a process using very high heat which makes metal more ductile and easier to shape. Reverse-draw creates a piece with a greater height than diameter - perfect for smaller pieces such as beverage cans. Like tooling, most manufacturers don’t offer these important services in-house. Finding one that does can save you time and budget.

Long-term trust
 The best option for your deep draw project ultimately comes down to a manufacturer’s experts and equipment. When a supplier has the right experience combined with a robust set of capabilities, OEMs rely on them again and again to create the pieces they need to bring products to market. Ask any potential suppliers about long-term relationships or whether they’ve provided services to an OEM for multiple product generations. While it may not be the most important factor in your decision-making process, knowing the supplier you are considering is trusted by organizations you respect can add a little extra peace-of-mind.

5 QUESTIONS TO ASK DEEP DRAW SUPPLIERS

1
2
3
4
5
What industries do you serve and what types of products do you work with?
How much experience do you have with deep draw?
What are your redundancy or risk plans?
What in-house capabilities do you offer that complement your deep draw services?

Do you have in-house design support?

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